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    Myra Austin
    Low Resolution Problems
    Topic posted August 18, 2012 by Myra AustinNovice 
    19082 Views, 11 Comments
    Title:
    Low Resolution Problems
    Summary:
    I need help on fixing low resolution pictures
    Content:
    <p>On some of my pictures I get a yellow triangle with a red exclamation point that says low resolution. What does this mean? How do I fix it? What will it look like if I dont do anything and leave it be? Can someone give me a small lesson in picture resolution? Obviously, I'm a novice and need it explained to me in Elementary English please. Thank you very much!</p>
    Image:

    Answer

     

    • HenryB

      Hi Myra,

      Basically, the low resolution warning is saying that the photo is smaller than the minimum size recommended for the product you have chosen. Typically, pictures are measured in pixels and consists of both a height and a width such as 2000x3000. If you search the Shutterfly Help Pages for "resolution", you will find the following article:

      Image resolution recommendations - all products

      Published 05/13/2009 09:42 AM   |    Updated 05/04/2012 04:48 PM
      What resolution do my pictures need to be?

      Most modern digital camera photos easily exceed our minimum recommended dimensions. Just set your camera to 3 megapixels or more.  (For products with larger print sizes, such as Canvas Prints and poster-sized prints, err on the side of higher resolution. And over 10 megapixels isn't really necessary!) 

      Note that Shutterfly currently only accepts JPG or JPEG file formats. Some additional quick tips:

      • Upload first, then crop! If you want to crop your photo, we recommend doing so after uploading the original to Shutterfly. It's easy, and the benefit is that you can adjust and change it easily.
      • We warn you about low-resolution images. If your image doesn't meet our recommended resolutions, the image will display on our site with a warning. This is to help prevent dissatisfaction due to ordering something that may not print well. It may look okay online, but may not print well. Your best bet is to use a different image.
      • Don't forget to check for overall image quality.  Our system can check for resolution but can't check for quality/clarity/focus/composition of the image, so be sure to keep this in mind.

      For images from Facebook (Photo book Simple Path only):
      I
      mages from Facebook are downsampled to a smaller size than the original file and may not have sufficient resolution for large image templates. We have adjusted our layouts to fit the resolution of these images but recommend you use the original image files if you have them available (such as on your computer).


      If you have an older digital camera or are using a lower-resolution setting to save space, we still recommend using a setting of at least 3 megapixels. Here are our recommended minimum resolutions. For photo books, see here.

       Original image dimensions (pixels)

      Camera equivalent

       Recommended print sizes

      Other products (use at least the indicated resolution)

       Note

        less than 640x480

       < 0.3 megapixels

       Wallet

      Not recommended - please use higher resolution

       While it's possible to get good 4x6 prints from this size, results may vary. We recommend higher-resolution whenever possible.

       640x480

      0.3 megapixels

       4x4, 4x6

      address labels

       4x4 sizes (square prints) are only available for scrapbook pages

       1024x768

      0.8 megapixels

      4x4, 4x6

      4x8 photo cards, magnets

       4x4 sizes (square prints) are only available for scrapbook pages

       1152x864

      ~1 megapixel

      5x7

      Greeting cards

       

       1600x1200

      ~2 megapixels

        8x8, 8x10

      Aprons, 8x10 collage poster

        8x8 sizes (square prints) are only available for scrapbook pages

      2000x1600

      ~3 megapixels

      11x14, 12x12, 16x20, 20x30

      11x14 or larger collage poster; all other products not specifically listed

       12x12 sizes (square prints) are only available for scrapbook pages

      2400x3600

      ~8 megapixels  

      24x36 canvas prints, fleece photo blankets, woven photo blankets

       

      What about DPI (Dots Per Inch), etc?
      Shutterfly bases a good "resolution" recommendation on the final resolution output of an image and therefore can't give a good recommendation on PPI (Pixels per Inch), LPI (Lines per Inch), or DPI (Dots per Inch). Please look at the final output resolution after the image is created to determine if it will print well on Shutterfly based on the above recommended resolutions.

      ============================================================================================

      What can you do about? This is tough to answer without knowing the details. Typically, the picture is too small or has been reduced in size during the upload.  If the picture is actually too small (before upload), there is not much whcih can be done other than choose a more appropriate product. If the picture size changed as a result of the upload, you can re-upload selecting a larger size for the upload. If you used the Express Uploader, be sure to choose the slowest upload which will maximize the size. Alternately, you can use the standard upload method which always uploads at the maximum size. The standard upload method is chosen when you click on the "Upload" button on the "My Pictures" tab in Shutterfly.

      It's best to check the size of the photo before and after upload. If you are using a Windows computer, you can right mouse click on the photo on your computer and choose "Properties". Click on the "Details" tab and you will see the size of the image. Then, compare this to the picture size in Shutterfly. To do this, find the pictures on your "My Pictures" page and double mouse click on it to put it in the enlarge view mode. If you look to the right of the picture, you will see a plus sign with the words "More info". Click this and you will see something like the following:

      The picture size is labeled "Resolution" and is 3000x2000 in this example. If this is smaller than the size on your computer, then the issue was the upload. If it's the same size as the picture on your computer, your options are limited. You can ignore the warning and order the product as is. I have used low resolution photos in photo books and got good results with the printing. However, you take a risk.

      It's aways better to meet the minimum picture size for the product you choose.

      I hope this helps. If not, please specify the product you are seeing the warning on and the size of your picture.

      HenryB (A Shutterfly user)

       

      • Myra Austin

        Thank you so much for the help. Your explination, although not totally understood, was understood enough to be very helpful. Thank you!

    • brianna clark

      i am using original images and when i put them in the photo book i am making, it looks pixelated. I have no warning sayng its a low res image. I put a different photo in and it does the same. why is this happening?

    • HenryB

      Hi Brianna,

      As long as your photos meet the minimum for photo books (see below), you should be fine.

      I have never seen pixelated photos in one of my books either printed or displayed on a computer screen. However, there was another posting about this which I can't now locate. Anyway, in that posting,  Shannon, the Admin, stated that the pictures displayed on your computer are displayed in a lower resolution than what is actually in the book because of practical concerns of transferring high resolution photos over the internet during the book creation process.

      If you are unsure, please contact  Shutterfly's Customer Service.

       

      If you search the Shutterfly Help Pages for "resolution", you will find the following article:

      Photo Book Resolution Recommendations

      Published 09/26/2005 04:39 PM   |    Updated 07/05/2012 02:54 PM
      What resolution should my images be for my photo book?

      For photo books, we recommend the following resolutions:

      • 12x12 photo book:  at least 2000 x 1600
      • 8x8, 8x11, and 7x9 photo books: at least 1600 x 1200
      • 5x7 photo book: at  least 1152 x 864

      For other products and more details about recommended resolutions, see here.

      What about images from Facebook?
      For images from Facebook (available for Simple Path photo books only): images from Facebook are downsampled to a smaller size than the original file and may not have sufficient resolution for large image templates. We have adjusted our layouts to fit the resolution of these images but recommend you use the original image files if you have them available (such as on your computer). For more about Facebook image resolution in PhotoBooks, see this article.

      What about DPI (Dots Per Inch), etc?
      Shutterfly bases a good "resolution" recommendation on the final resolution output of an image and therefore can't give a good recommendation on PPI (Pixels per Inch), LPI (Lines per Inch), or DPI (Dots per Inch). Please look at the final output resolution after the image is created to determine if it will print well on Shutterfly based on the above recommended resolutions.

      Other notes on Photo Book resolution:

      • Our recommendations for resolution are based on:
        • "Full-bleed" picture layouts used in a photo book. Other page layouts may need less resolution, so if you meet the “full bleed” you should not have any problems printing.
        • Recommendations are based on the overall resolution of your picture only, and not on quality/clarity/focus/composition of the image, which our system cannot check for.
      • If your resolution is not sufficient, you will see a "not recommended" warning on the site. The picture may look okay online, but the results when printed may be unsatisfactory. We strongly recommend not using such images in your photo book.
      • To check the resolution of your pictures once you have transferred them to Shutterfly, go to My pictures and double-click on a thumbnail image to view it;  you will then see a larger version of the picture, with maximum recommended print size. Click on the "More info" link. Among the information displayed you will find the resolution.

      ===================================================================================

      HenryB (A Shutterfly user)

       

      • Myra Austin

        Thank you so much for taking the time to answer my question. I have found the answers I've received to be very helpful.

    • Kathleen W.

      To put a "plain English" spin on a fact that is sort of buried in the two Shutterfly Help pages posted above:  sometimes -- though not always -- you may be able to "fix" a low resolution problem by reducing the size of the photo as it appears in your book.   Similarly, another reason why you might get a low resolution warning has to do with the way you use the crop feature -- if you try to crop a photo to focus on one small detail, and then enlarge the size of newly cropped photo, you may eventually run into a resolution problem, even if the resolution of the original photo meets Shutterfly's minimum requirements.  For example, I recently cropped a photo to focus on a tiny house in the background of a snapshot that was medium resolution.   When I tried to use that newly cropped photo as a full page (or full bleed) photo in my book, I got a low resolution warning.  I then reduced the size of the photo as it appeared on the page, but still got the warning.  Finally, I recropped the photo so that there was "extra" space around the house, and got a sufficient resolution to print decently.  If you start with high resolution photos you will of course have the most flexibility, so it's always good to get those when you can.  But when other people share their photos with you electronically, you may just have to work with what you've got, and playing with the photo size is one way to do that.  Good luck -- you are off to a good start by asking good questions!

    • Myra Austin

      Thank you so very much. I understood most of that and it was very helpful.

    • I C

      My version of explanation is that all pictures are made up by a bunch of dots. Technically speaking, the more dots you can pack together, the clearer your image will be. "High resolution" thus basically means "high dot density" and vice versa.  When you get your file from the internet or a camera, the number of dots in the picture is pretty much fixed. However, by changing the size of the final picture, you can modify the dot density (resolution) of the picture.

      Computer screens typically have 72-96 dots in an inch and it looks clear enough (because we don't stare at the screen that closely or in scrutiny). Printed material however, needs much higher density of dots because we look at them much closely than when we look at a screen. Typically, it is recommended that the dot density on printed media should be at least 150-200 dots per inch (may have some minor visible pixelization) and desirably 300+ dpi. 600-1200 dpi is a little on the overkill side, but a higher density never hurts. I am not sure what the threshold is for shutterfly, but the above numbers should serve as a good guideline for you on what is "ok". I typically stick with 300-480 dpi for photographs.

      If you are into photo editing, your software can possibily increase the resolution using special mathematical algorithms. That is, it can actually spit out new dots in between the existing dots. While helpful at a slight increase in resolution, it will not produce good results when you try to abuse it (such as doubling the resolution). Generally, you should avoid doing this unless you really know what you are doing.

    • Mark Allion

      I am an amateur Photographer. I faced problem with low resolution problem for some months. I need to make a poster for my clients but some time the provided picture is with low resolution. But thanks to God I found solution for this problem. I goggled and found software which allows accurate, high quality and realistic enlargements at any zoom factor. It named Reshade image resizing tools. Easy to use automatic settings make Reshade the perfect choice for beginners. Advanced controls are available for professional users. Anybody can solve this type of low image resolution problem solution from Photo enlargement software. Hope this will be helpful. Thanks. ---Mark

    • Chad Wagner

      Hi, my question may have been answered above, but I just wanted to clarify a problem I may or may not be having when I drop photos into my photobook.

      HenryB said above: "I have never seen pixelated photos in one of my books either printed or displayed on a computer screen. However, there was another posting about this which I can't now locate. Anyway, in that posting,  Shannon, the Admin, stated that the pictures displayed on your computer are displayed in a lower resolution than what is actually in the book because of practical concerns of transferring high resolution photos over the internet during the book creation process."

      Does that mean I shouldn't worry that the quality of some of my photos are blurry when uploaded? Before upload, they are perfectly clear on my computer. But when I look at them all listed under the "Photos" tab, some appear low res. Yet, I receive no warning when I place them onto a page that they are low res.

      I guess my ultimate question is, when I look at my photos in the Photobook, are they the same quality that I see when I look at the photo using Windows Photo Gallery (the default viewer I have on my computer - a Windows Vista) - before upload? Or is there a decrease in resolution when the photos are uploaded? All I care about is the quality of picture I'll see when I receive my finished photobook.

      And no, size isn't a problem for me. They still appear blurry no matter how big or small I make the picture.

      Most photos I'm using were taken with my iPhone 4S. Whenever I've looked at them on my phone, they've been fine. Whenever I've looked at them on my computer, they've been slightly less quality than on my phone, but the change in quality is pretty big when I look at them through Shutterfly compared to my computer. Again, not all photos in my photobook, but some. I don't understand what happens.

      Thanks.